Beard Necessities (Winston Brothers, #7) crime

Download Textbooks Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and ReasonAuthor Nancy Pearl – Wildlives.co

I found it a bit sloppy. Halfhearted reasons/reviews, then chunks of more books thrown at the end of each category for no reason whatsoever it seems. She also seems to be obsessed with adventures to the arctic and Antarctic circles and mountain climbing. I got a few recs but I think I could write this book in my sleep. First, the title. How could a reader not love the title Book Lust? Paired with the enchanting cover, it's a perfect cover/package deal that immediately drew my eye. I really need to find more books ABOUT books, and have several on my wishlist.

Nancy Pearl is an admirable womanthe intro to the book is one of more interesting parts as she discusses having a troubled childhood and using books as a path of escape. She emphasizes the second home she made in her local library and the respect gathered for the local librarians, who inspired her so much she became a librarian herself.

I have go into something hereI keep seeing everywhere on here that elsewhere Nancy Pearl's words of wisdom on giving a book a chance, and most of it is listed as wrong. Even the sequel lists this in the plot description of it:

..."and her Rule of 50 (give a book 50 pages before deciding whether to continue; but readers over 50 must read the same number of pages as their age) became a standard MO."

It actually reads from her book:

"I live by what I call "the rule of fifty," which acknowledges that time is short and the world of books is immense. If you're fifty years old or younger, give every book about fifty pages before you decide to commit yourself to reading it, or give it up. If you're over fifty, which is when time gets even shorter, subtract your age from 100the result is the number of pages you should read before deciding."

I love the categories in the book, and they're broken down into an amazing ensemble of categories. A qualm I hold is I wish she would have gone more indepth with some sections and their books. Sometimes it's listing them as a mere list.

I liked how she describes blending Horror, Fantasy, and ScienceFiction: "Science fiction deals with the world of the possible, if not the probable; fantasy deals with another world, one that doesn't conform to the natural laws of the world in which we live; and horror fiction (often referred to as dark fantasy) depicts a world marked by unnatural terrors." Even with this cool description, she admits to not really being a horror fan and not even reading Stephen King books.

One thing I notice is, while she rarely mentions a book twice in any list, she has now brought up Pat Conroy's Prince of Tides at least 45 categories now. I've heard good things about it and the movie was enjoyable. Thankfully I own it TBR. She apparently thought it was so intriguing I just "bumped it" up to read much sooner.

I recognized some of the titles in the lists, but honestly most of the stuff she mentions was unrecognizable to me. My wishlist grew though, and I became interested in being open minded to more subjects. It's amazing that she's read so many books on so many subjects, good grief.

This is more of a guide/list/reference than something that you sit down and enjoy reading. I do wish it were a bit more organized sometimes, more details were given for many of the books, and more explanations on some things.






Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every MoodNotRetrouvez Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every Mood, Moment, And Reason Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D Occasion Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every Mood, Her Book Expertise And Recommendations Are Gathered In Book Lust, A Compilation Of Books Of All Genres For Every Mood, Moment, And Reason As Is Her Catch Phrase Thumbing Through Book Lust, You Ll Find The Most Intriguing Categories And Descriptions Of Books And Novels You Most Likely Would Never Have Thought To Pick Up Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every Mood, Moment, AndRecommended Reading For Every Mood, Moment, And Reason, Book Lust, Nancy Pearl, Sasquatch Books Des Milliers De Livres Avec La Livraison Chez Vous Enjour Ou En Magasin Avec % De RductionBook Lust To Go Recommended Reading ForNotRetrouvez Book Lust To Go Recommended Reading For Travelers Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D OccasionBook Lust To Go Recommended Reading ForNotRetrouvez Book Lust To Go Recommended Reading For Travelers, Vagabonds, And Dreamers Et Des Millions De Livres En Stock SurAchetez Neuf Ou D Occasion Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every Mood, Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every Mood, Moment, And Reason Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every Mood, Our Focus This Time Is On Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every Mood, Moment, And Reason By Nancy Pearl, A Longtime Freelance Contributor Of Reviews To This Magazine See Our Review Of The Book On P Of This Issue When Booklist Asked Pearl About The Provenance Of Her New Book, Her Answer Struck Us As The Dream Of Every Writer And Book Lover The Publisher Came To Me, She The Well Book Lust By Nancy Pearl Book Lust Recommended Reading For Every Mood, Moment, And Reason By Nancy Pearl My Ratingofstars Fascinating A Z Journey Through Some Of This Famous Librarian S Favorite Books I Decided To Just Enjoy Her Take And Not Furiously Make Another List To Get Through L View All My Reviews Get our of your rut! Get this book!

My daughter works at a used book store, and gave me this to keep me from constantly asking her to recommend books for me, since our preferences have diverged more in recent years. (I'm just not into graphic novels and microbiology.)

That said, everyone should have a copy of this book and its companion (More). Of course, it's not the list of the thousand books you must read before you die. Someone else did that, so don't whine that it doesn't have all your favorites in it. That's not the point of this book. She might remind you of things you've loved and suggest more like it, or just offer you a glimpse into genres that you've never even considered or imagined.

I've also reviewed "More Book Lust."

A small hintread this with a highlighter. I use red for read, and yellow for those I'm looking for. I'm a huge fan of booklists, and this was a good example of one. Most of the books chosen by Pearl aren't bestsellers or award winners, but are more obscure options that you probably haven't read yet. She arranges the collection into 175 useful, creative, and humorous lists. The lists are named specifically, presented in alphabetical order, and posted in the Table of Contents. Some examples are: Adventure by the Book, Bird Brains (books about birds), Fathers and Daughters, First Novels, Shrinks and Shrinkees, Hanky Reads, Zero (literally...books about the concept of zero), Chick Lit, Elvis on my Mind, Families in Trouble, and 9/11. She also includes works from "Too Good To Miss" authors, and most of her recommendations include a brief description of the work. I checked this out from the library, but I'll probably buy it at some point. This is a great gift for book lovers and a wonderful addition to the shelf of any reader. There is also a companion volume, "More Book Lust," and a movie version, "Movie Lust," that are probably worth checking out. What an unfortunate title. I expected some bibliothecal titillation, Viagra for the bookworm, tales of mad pursuit, extreme in their quest to hunt, have, and swallow whole the objects of our literary passions. But like all lusts, this joy proposed proved a very woe. Instead of a bibliobuzz, I wasted an hour or so skimming over some of the most limp and dispassionate recommendations of modern writing imaginable. To my shame, I didn't finish the book. In fact, Pearl recommends that you abandon any book that hasn't hooked you after 50 pages. Sage advice. I read 51, and shunned the rest.

The brevity and baldness of her reviews was frustrating, and some of her 'creative' categories seemed to have been borrowed from Jeopardy! (Do we really gain anything from list of books written by authors whose first name is Alice?). After twenty pages I started to doubt that Pearl had really read more than the back cover of the books she lists, and by page 50 I was certain that she didn't have anything exciting or particularly useful to say about most of them (Could she at least have told us when the books were published?). I usually devour books on books, but Book Lust (2003), left me peeved not only with the author, but with most of the books she listed. I got the impression that the great bulk of recent fiction is hardly worth writing about ... or reading. Pearl's lust for books may have led her to indiscriminately swallow a library, but where is the love? The prospect of more books to read has always been a seductive one for me. Knowing that there are more books out there than I can ever hope of reading is a fact that stimulates ( to read more & more ) and depresses (but I can’t read them all !) me in equal measure. It was a conscious decision to read more books about books this year and keep fantasizing about them all. It certainly made me think if this is what they might someday call bibliophilic masturbation ?

So, I did start off the year with Heather Reyes followed closely by Michael Dirda whose writings are impassioned experiences on how reading changes and enriches lives. There were anecdotes to learn from and anecdotes to cherish among those pages. An afterburn of these books was what led me to Nancy Pearl’s work titled Booklust. Now the word lust evokes a fiery passion of sorts (stirring in the loins apart !) towards a topic which in this case was bibliophilia. The introduction for this book was something that got me interested and here is a sample of Pearl’s reading habit :

"I live by what I call "the rule of fifty," which acknowledges that time is short and the world of books is immense. If you're fifty years old or younger, give every book about fifty pages before you decide to commit yourself to reading it, or give it up. If you're over fifty, which is when time gets even shorter, subtract your age from 100the result is the number of pages you should read before deciding."

In a watereddown format, I follow the same strategy to read. Considering the volumes out there which are unread, there isn’t much time to plod through the uninteresting ones. However,as I read the first chapter, I realized that it fails this litmus test.How’s that for irony ?

A book attracts you when it has a soul, when the author or the characters are able to reach out and find a resonance with you.Unless there is a life to the topic, the book is just words printed on paper. The contents of this book while they talk in detail about a lot many works and authors lacks this zest. The effort that the author has put in to categorize books under the different headings is something that needs to be applauded though. There are books on various topics, moods and yes it lives up to its subtitle of “Recommended Reading” but the actual meat of the book is not anything to lust after. There are names of countless books in here but the author never tells us why we should read it. For instance, under the topic of the Vietnam war she mentions that one must read Tim O Brien’sThe things they carried. But my question is : Ms. Pearl why do you think I should read it ? What are your insights on it ? What makes it stand out ? The answer to these is deafening silence and you will only hear your own voice echoing back. The book rattles out names and titles which start to resemble a grocery shopping list after a few chapters.

I went through the book, skipped a few chapters and pages and finally completed it. Then comes this questions as to what did I gain. A few interesting book titles to check out, but beyond that ? Nothing.

Quite interestingly, a good 60% of the books listed here are the usual suspects. You wouldn’t need an expert to tell you that John Le Carre’s – The spy who came in from the cold is a masterpiece in espionage fiction !

For someone starting off on the reading journey, this is a fantastic start. But if you already have a ton of books marked out as ‘toread’, this one will give you a few additional things to read with no indicator as to why to read them ! I'm upping this to three stars because she mentioned Barbara Hambly and The Little White Horse.

But honesty, if you are talking about dog books and you don't mention Albert Payson Terhune, there is something wrong with you.

It's a little bit disorganized and the list descriptions are bit weird. I also hate grouping fantasy, scifi and horror together, by cyber punk gets its own section. She also repeats quite a few book titles. But I did jot down quiet a few titles I want to look at. One of the most interesting ''book about books'' I've had the pleasure to read. Nancy Pearl divides different themes, structural techniques, genres and authors, in alphabetical order, and each one of the chapters is accompanied by a comprehensive list of suggestive readings. Her writing is comprehensive and flowing, and although, I thought that she missed some books that are ''landmarks'' in a few of the genres, she brings to focus many lessread novels and nonfiction books. Perfect for those of us who wish to broaden their reading material a bit and discover new literary worlds. Enjoy! I can't begin to tell you how many wonderful books that I've gotten from "Book Lust". It's a perfect manual for deciding just what to read. It's also a great conversation starter. While carrying it around I've had people ask me about it. So besides being a wonderful book of books, it also has gained me some literary friends.